Edging Flower Beds, The Right Sized Pot, and A New Plant On the Block

Do you like that nice, crisp line that edging a lawn provides in your landscape? Are you hungry for a delicious stuffing to prepare this Thanksgiving? Ellen and C.L. have thoughts and suggestions. They are also anxious to introduce you to the new kids on the block…not the band, but some great new varieties of a native shrub. All of that plus a discussion about the importance of the size of pots for indoor or outdoor containers.

:28 What’s for dinner: Wild mushroom and chestnut stuffing…foraged or store bought
3:50 True or False: Garden beds need to be “edged” every year.
11:02 Eat/Drink/Grow:  New Kid On The Block: Diervilla shrubs!
17:30 Love Letters and Questions:   Barbara wrote saying, “My question is about pots for container plantings.

Find the recipe for Ellen’s Mushroom Stuffing here.

Ellen was in heaven when she found this stand of honey mushrooms in and among the roots of beech trees.

Please don’t eat any mushroom you’re not familiar with based solely on a photo that you see online! Ellen knows her mushrooms, so she’s sure about what she harvests.

This is an example of a traditionally “edged” bed. Note how the bed on the right is getting larger and larger, with more and more bare mulch. I advised this homeowner to have lawn restored back at least a foot so that the lawn doesn’t continue to disappear.

Here is an informal edging done with flat stones. The lawnmower wheels ride right on top of those stones, cutting the grass cleanly. The next photo shows how it looks after the plants have grown into these beds.

This is one of the lovely new Diervilla shrubs that we have access to. Click on the photo to see this on the Bloomin’ Easy website.

Learn about an easy, vegetable comfort dish and the Norfolk Island Pine houseplant. Discover great holiday gifts and find out what is meant by “genus and species.” There are no stupid questions here, as long as the topic is plants!

:30 What’s For Dinner:   Twice Baked Potatoes
6:42  Eat/Drink/Grow:   Norfolk Island Pine Araucaria heterophylla native to Norfolk Island, a small island between Australia and New Zealand and not really a pine.
14:34 Insider Information: The Plantrama Gift List
21:28 Love Letters and Questions: Could you please explain the terms species and genus?

Gift List:
Our Books and Plantrama Merch
Mastering the Art of Vegetable Gardening: Rare Varieties - Unusual Options - Plant Lore & Guidance Matt Mattus
Orbit B-hyve Irrigation
Gift certificate from Botanical Interest Seeds

All sorts of veggies can be mixed into the potato...kale, broccoli, chard, or winter squash are some favorites

You can freeze twice baked potatoes after you put them together. Then they are ready to take out of the freezer and bake when you need healthy comfort food.

People appreciate a Norfolk Island Pine as a substitute indoor Christmas tree because it's bright green and the layered branches can hold some ornaments.

Some put this plant out in a dappled sun location for the summer. If you wish to do so, wait until all danger of frost is past.

 

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